FAQs

Violin

Deciding whether to buy or rent a violin is an important question that many beginner violin students face. There is no straight-forward answer to this question since it depends on your individual circumstances, but there are distinct benefits to both options.

The main benefit of buying a violin instead of renting it is that it generally retains its value throughout its life which makes trading it in for a larger size or higher quality violin very viable.

The main benefit of renting a violin is that you don’t own the instrument, so if it’s damaged or your student wants to quit, you can just return it to the music store. No need to pay a repair bill or find a buyer.

To read more about the differences and see examples, read our guide on renting vs buying.

Category: Violin

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The violin bow price can vary widely from less than $50 to well over $5000 depending on the material, the craftsmanship, and weight. In general, you should look for a violin bow that costs between 20-25% of the violin price.

Typically, the following violin bow prices apply depending on the material used:

  • Fiberglass: Fiberglass violin bows tend to be on the low-end of the violin bow price spectrum and are typically used by beginner violin students. Expect to spend less than $100 on a fiberglass violin bow.
  • Carbon Fiber: Carbon fiber violin bows are usually priced in the middle between fiberglass and wooden. They are known to be extremely durable so they are a great all-purpose violin bow material. You should expect to spend between $50 to $300 for a carbon fiber violin bow.
  • Wooden: Wooden violin bows are typically made from Pernambuco wood from Brazil. Depending on what part of the tree was used to make the bow, wooden violin bow prices can range from around $50 to well into the $1000s.

If you want to learn more about what to look for in violin bow, you can read our guide on buying violin bows.

Category: Violin

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Violins come in different levels for players on different stages of their learning journey. These various levels are built with different levels of craftsmanship which has a direct impact on the violin cost.

Many students start out by renting violins for practice until they are ready to own one. If you’re looking to buy a new violin, you’ll want to know how much to spend. We’ve summarized our findings below, but you can read our full article about buying a violin.

Generally, violin costs fall under the following three categories:

  • Student Violins: These are for beginners. Young students or players at the early stage of learning the violin are constantly working on the basics of playing, tone production, fingering, bowing etc. Hence, maple (dyed black to resemble ebony) is sometimes used for the pegs and fingerboards, areas that are exposed to more friction. Student violins are mostly machine-made to keep costs low while maintaining tone consistency. Quite affordable. Student violin prices range from $200 – $2,500.
  • Intermediate to Advanced Violins: With higher workmanship, the sound of an intermediate violin is also much better. There are more dynamics and stronger projection. The pegs and fingerboards are crafted with ebony and most of the instrument is handcrafted. Intermediate violin prices range from $500 – $10,000.
  • Professional Violins: Pure craftsmanship using the finest quality of wood, professional violins exude a rich tone and wide dynamics. Masterpieces like these command a higher violin price. Prices go from $10,000 onwards.
Category: Violin

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Viola

Deciding whether to buy or rent a cello is an important question that many beginner viola students face. The answer depends on your individual circumstances so we cannot provide a definitive answer, but there are distinct benefits to both options.

The advantage of buying a viola instead of renting it is that it generally retains its value throughout its life which makes trading it in for a larger size or higher quality violin very viable.

The advantage of renting a viola is that you don’t own the instrument, so if it’s damaged or your student wants to quit, you can just return it to the music store. No need to pay a repair bill or find a buyer.

To read more about the differences and see examples, read our guide on renting vs buying.

Category: Viola

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Cello

Deciding whether to buy or rent a cello is an important question that many beginner cello students face. The answer depends on your individual circumstances so we cannot provide a definitive answer, but there are distinct benefits to both options.

The advantage of buying a cello instead of renting it is that it generally retains its value throughout its life which makes trading it in for a larger size or higher quality violin very viable.

The advantage of renting a cello is that you don’t own the instrument, so if it’s damaged or your student wants to quit, you can just return it to the music store. No need to pay a repair bill or find a buyer.

To read more about the differences and see examples, read our guide on renting vs buying.

Category: Cello

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Cello costs range widely since the price is mostly based on the level of craftsmanship used in making the cello which typically affects the sound. A higher-quality sound uses costs more.

Student cellos built for beginners are usually machine-made so they can be much cheaper averaging around $300-$400. On the higher-end, professional level cellos can cost well over $10,000.

Many students start out by renting cellos for practice until they are ready to own one. Essentially, cellos fall under three categories for pricing:

  • Student Cellos: Student cellos are designed for beginner cello players. They are generally machine-made so that costs remain low for students who aren’t sure that they will continue playing cello. Since young students are typically learning how to play, maple (dyed black to resemble ebony) is sometimes used for the pegs and fingerboards, areas that are exposed to more friction. Student cello prices range from $200 – $2,500.
  • Intermediate to Advanced Cellos: With higher workmanship, the sound of an intermediate cello is also much better. There are more dynamics and stronger projection. The pegs and fingerboards are crafted with ebony and most of the instrument is handcrafted. Intermediate/advanced cello prices range from $500 – $10,000.
  • Professional Cellos: Pure craftsmanship using the finest quality of wood, professional cellos exude a rich tone and wide dynamics. Masterpieces like these are expensive. Professional cello prices go from $10,000 onwards.

Typically, how much one pays for a cello is how much one can expect from the quality. A cello priced at the extreme low hundreds tends to be “unplayable” while the more expensive ones can balance both playability and sound production better.

Of course, the price is not always merely an indication of product quality. Sometimes, it also incorporates the name of the cello maker. As a cello maker’s fame increases, so does the value of the instruments he crafts. The question of how much is a cello worth often depends on a variety of characteristics of that cello.

Category: Cello

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Double Bass